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Digital Intern Recovery Score: a method of thin slicing information enhances clinical communication of each patient’s recovery process.
John H Braxton, Scott A Buchanon, Desmond Donegan, Louis Russo, Seth Blank, Paul Weldner, Reed D. Quinn
Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME

Objective: Information technology (IT) potentially offers advantages over paper based process and systems. IT promises to improve information sharing. Thin slicing of information attempts to collapse multiple data points into a single character point. We tested a web based tool that graphs the recovery process of the cardiac surgery patient over time.
Design/Settings: . We prospectively studied 50 patients to validate the recovery score with discharge readiness (Score >100).
Interventions. Recovery scoring was performed and compared to clinical criteria at the time of discharge.
Main Outcome Measure(s): Recovery scoring is based on physiological criteria from each organ system. A composite score is generated resulting in the recovery score. We prospectively studied 50 patients to validate the recovery score with discharge readiness (Score >100).
Results:Normal and Abnormal healing curves were generated(Images). 62% (31/50) of patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, 6.%(3/50) had their ascending aortas replaced. 32% (16/50) had valves repaired or replaced. The average age was 65.4.STD± 9.6 with an average length of stay of 6.1±2.2 days. The correlation coefficient for discharged with scores greater than or equal to 100 was 0 .81( R = 0.81 R2= 0.65)
Conclusion: Thin slicing of the recovery process is feasible. Scores greater than 100 correlates with readiness for discharge. Healing curves effectively summarize the recovery process. These findings have important implications for information technology in all surgical specialties.


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