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90th Annual Meeting Abstracts


Comparing Patient Survey with Surgeon Survey and Chart Review within a Quality Improvement Project Studying Surgical Site Infections.
*Dawn M Stapleton, MD, Robert Hawkins, MD, *Douglas Salvador
Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME

Objective: In the era of quality improvement, utilizing patient input through the use of surveys is an important way to obtain data. Our objective was to compare patient survey with surgeon survey and chart review within an on-going study of superficial surgical site infections.
Design: After participating in a randomized, control trial comparing a pre-operative antiseptic soap wash with a commercially available soap wash we obtained post-operative surveys from patients who had undergone vascular surgery involving an inguinal incision. Surveys inquired about surgical site infection as well as another reason the patient may have been on antibiotics. Surgeon surveys were also collected and chart review was performed.
Setting: Single institution, community based hospital
Patients: Any patient (>18 y.o.) being evaluated for a non-emergent vascular operation in which an inguinal incision is made including: lower extremity bypass or open or endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.
Interventions: Antiseptic soap group versus commercially available soap group. Patients are given instructions on how to wash their groin area the night before and morning of surgery.
Main Outcome Measures: Correlation between patient survey, surgeon survey and chart review.
Results:
The same inguinal wound infection rate was measured using the three methods in 47 cases (92.2%, kappa=0.89). In most cases the patient survey was concordant with the chart review but not with the surgeon survey.
Conclusions: Patient survey, surgeon survey and chart review provided similar rates for the measurement of surgical site infections. Patient surveys may be a reliable method to obtain information in quality improvement projects.


 

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